4 short briefings released for businesses & investors on reporting requirements under UK Modern Slavery Act

The Modern Slavery Act requires companies with a turnover of more than £36m operating in the UK to publish an annual statement setting out what they have done to eradicate slavery and human trafficking from their supply chains and operations.

Together with Anti-Slavery International, Unicef UK and the Business and Human Rights Resource Centre, CORE has now released three short briefings on reporting under the Act for businesses, and one briefing for investors. These have been published alongside an introductory video outlining expectations of businesses covered by modern slavery legislation. 

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Article
12 June 2017

Briefing: Modern slavery reporting: Weak and notable practice

Author: CORE, Anti-Slavery International, Unicef UK, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre

This particular briefing draws on CORE’s and BHRRC’s analysis of 83 slavery and human trafficking statements in February 2016, BHRRC’s October 2016 review of FTSE 100 company reports; and Ergon Associates’ research on company statements up to May 2016... At the time of publication, 2108 modern slavery statements have been uploaded onto BHRRC’s Modern Slavery Act Registry. Only around 14% of these statements comply with the legal requirements and most provide little information on the six areas that the Act suggests companies may wish to report on... CORE has randomly selected examples of companies’ modern slavery statements to provide an overview of the type of information that businesses should include in their statementswith reference to the six reporting areas listed in the Act. The aim of this guide is to highlight areas for improvement in an effort to drive up standards of report- ing and to increase accountability across the board. 

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Article
12 June 2017

Briefing: Recommended content for a modern slavery statement

Author: CORE, Anti-Slavery International, Unicef UK, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre

[This] is one of four briefings designed to provide information for business on reporting under the Transparency in Supply Chains clause in the Modern Slavery Act 2015...

1. The Slavery and Human Trafficking Statement: Legal Requirements

Section 54 of the UK Modern Slavery Act (2015) requires commercial organisations operating in the UK with an annual turnover in excess of £36m to produce a ‘slavery and human trafficking statement for each financial year of the organisation’... Companies that do not meet these basic requirements are breaking the law.

2. Content of the statement

...A company’s slavery and human trafficking statement should make clear its commitment to tackling modern slavery, and substantiate this by documenting its risk-mapping processes, relevant policies, training procedures, action plans, and engagement stakeholders... 

3. Appropriate content for each of the six areas listed in the Act 

...Section 54(5) of the Modern Slavery Act lists six areas which companies ‘may’ cover in their statements. This briefing [...] provide[s] an overview of the type of information that companies should provide... 

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Article
12 June 2017

Briefing: Tackling modern slavery through human rights due diligence

Author: CORE, Anti-Slavery International, Unicef UK, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre

A robust modern slavery statement should be developed and presented in the context of a company’s ongoing human rights due diligence process. Yet initial analyses of modern slavery statements indicate that social auditing remains the default approach to assessing and monitoring risks in the supply chain, despite its known limitations in detecting modern slavery risks. This briefing seeks to provide an introductory overview of human rights due diligence, to support companies to identify and respond effectively to modern slavery risks in their operations and supply chains... 

Human rights due diligence is comprised of the following key steps: 

1. Assessing actual and potential human rights impacts... 

2. Integrating and acting on the findings...

3. Tracking responses...

4. Explaining how impacts are ad- dressed...

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Article
12 June 2017

Engaging with Companies on Modern Slavery – A Briefing for Investors

Author: CORE, Anti-Slavery International, Unicef UK, Business & Human Rights Resource Centre

This briefing supports investors to engage with companies on their actions to tackle modern slavery and human trafficking in their operations and supply chains. It provides investors with:

  • A rationale for engagement: modern slavery risks are pervasive in business supply chains and have the potential to impact on regulation and share price.
  • Criteria for corporate engagement: which companies to prioritise?
  • Questions to initiate dialogue: engaging with companies that have only just started to consider their exposure to modern slavery, as well as questions for companies that are more advanced in addressing this issue.
  • Guidance on evaluating companies’ responses: fundamentals for all companies on understanding modern slavery risk.
  • Ideas for further action: including considering modern slavery risks when constructing investment portfolios, through to supporting collaborations and engaging policy makers on the issues. 

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