Syrian refugees: Abuse & exploitation in Turkish garment factories

Hundreds of thousands Syrian refugees are working in Turkish apparel factories (and numbers continue to rise). Most of them do not have the right to work, and therefore are vulnerable to abuse and exploitation.  Women make up the majority of the textile workforce and are therefore particularly at risk as are children who are also being used in large numbers.

In December 2015 the Business & Human Rights Resource Centre developed a questionnaire which it sent to 28 leading brands asking them about the steps they were taking to protect Syrian refugees from abuse and exploitation in their Turkish supply chain.  You can access the responses and non responses provided by brands here and our briefing on the findings along with recommendations for brands here.

Below is a collection of the latest resources on this important issue.

Get RSS feed of these results

Related stories and components

Article
13 March 2017

Turkey: How do Syrian refugee workers challenge supply chain management in garment industry?

Author: Emre Eren Korkmaz, International Migration Institute, University of Oxford

"How do Syrian refugee workers challenge supply chain management in the Turkish garment industry?"...

Read more

Article
21 February 2017

Foreign child workers exploited in sweatshops in Istanbul’s Küçükpazar

Author: Hurriyet Daily News

The Küçükpazar neighborhood of Istanbul’s Fatih district has become a center of sweatshops, where children from outside Turkey are forced to work in shocking conditions. The large commercial buildings in the narrow streets of Küçükpazar, behind the...

Read more

Story
21 February 2017

Turkey: Child labour widespread across agricultural, construction and textile sectors

(Photo credit: DHA photos)

See full story

Story
24 October 2016

Panorama - Undercover: The Refugees Who Make Our Clothes

...

See full story

Article
21 October 2016

In Turkish sweatshops, Syrian children sew to survive

Author: Dasha Afanasiev, Reuters

To stem the flow of migrants to Europe, Turkey agreed to house and protect those Europe ejects. But Ankara is proving unable to protect all its Syrian refugee children. Many work illegally, including in the $40 billion textiles industry.

Read more

Article
1 October 2016

'Press 1 for child labor': Garment workers use cellphones to report abuses

Author: Rina Chandran, Reuters [UK]

extile workers from Bangladesh to Turkey are using cellphones to report child labor, delayed wages and trafficking - a trend rights groups say shows the promise of technology in tackling abuses in the garment industry...Two mobile services, both by U...

Read more

Article
6 June 2016

Turkey: Syrian child refugees allegedly found in sweatshop making military uniforms for ISIS

Author: Isabel Hunter & Salem Rizk, Mail Online (UK)

'Child slaves' making uniforms for Isis: Inside the Turkish sweatshop where children as young as nine work 12 hours a day stitching combat gear used in battle by Islamic State...

Read more

Article
6 May 2016

Turkey: From war to sweatshop for Syria's child refugees

Author: Patrick Kingsley, Guardian (UK)

According to Unicef, more than half of Turkey’s 2.7 million registered Syrian refugees are children – and nearly 80% of them are not in school...Campaigners believe that many of the rest are in work, for salaries far below the minimum wage....Hamza’s...

Read more

Article
12 April 2016

Turkey: Concerns over continued labour exploitation as only 0.1% of Syrian refugees in line for work permits

Author: Patrick Kingsley, Guardian (UK)

Fewer than 0.1% of Syrians in Turkey currently stand to gain the right to work under much-vaunted Turkish labour laws...Turkish employers have allowed roughly 2,000 – or 0.074% – of Turkey’s 2.7 million Syrians to apply for work permits under new...

Read more

Article
30 March 2016

Primark announces increased supply chain checks in Turkey following concerns over exploitation of Syrian workers

Author: RTÉ News

Fashion chain Primark has said it has ramped up checks on the factories it uses in Turkey to ensure Syrian refugees are not exploited as part of a growing company policy to ensure workers are fairly treated. Paul Lister, head of the Irish company's...

Read more