Tanzania: Report says local communities "consistently" reporting dissatisfaction with compensation to pave way for extractive companies

The Institute for Human Rights and Business recently released a report on the human rights impacts of the extractive sector in Tanzania. The report identified local communities' consistent reports of dissatisfaction in the amount of compensation received to pave way for companies and the threat that displacement poses the their livelihoods.

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Report
3 December 2016

Full report

Author: Institute for Human Rights & Business

"Human Rights in Tanzania's Extractive Sector: Exploring the Terrain"

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Article
3 December 2016

Report on the human rights and environmental issues in Tanzania's growing extractive sector

Author: Institute for Human Rights & Business

“Human Rights in Tanzania’s Extractive Sector: Exploring the Terrain”

This Report…assess[es] the existing human rights and environmental impacts attributed to Tanzania’s increasing extractive sector activities…

While the Report highlights a range of impacts, the increasing pace of granting mining and oil and gas concessions in areas occupied by communities has predictably made the adverse impacts on land rights the most prevalent complaint arising from formal and informal extractives activities in Tanzania.  This is not only because resource extraction must take place beneath the land that communities rely on for livelihoods, but also because land and extractive laws subordinate community rights to resource exploration and extraction.  Community members consistently reported dissatisfaction with compensation for land acquisition, the lack of security of land tenure, and the multiple impacts of resettlement.

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